2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season: What's in a Name? - myfoxcarolinas.com

2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season: What's in a Name?

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2014 Atlantic Hurricane Names 2014 Atlantic Hurricane Names
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The 2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season begins on June 1st and runs through November 30th. While the forecast calls for a near average or below average season, we’re bound to get through a few of the names on the list.

But where do those names come from? And how are they decided? We’ve got all the answers to your questions.

When were storms first given names?

Tropical storms have been given names for hundreds of years. Most were named arbitrarily. During World War II, naming storms became prominent in weather map discussions among forecasters. This was especially true for Army and Navy meteorologists as they plotted the movements of storms.

It wasn’t until 1953 that the United States started to use an international phonetic alphabet to name storms. That same year, the U.S. also began using female names for storms.

In 1978, alternating male and female names began for Eastern North Pacific storm lists. By 1979, male and female names were included in storm lists for the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico.

How often are names reused?

Twenty-one names are in each list. The lists are used in rotation and are recycled every six years. So the 2014 list will be used again in 2020.

Are the lists changed or are names ever retired?

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) maintains and updates the lists and any changes are discussed at an annual meeting of the WMO committee.

If a storm leads to a large loss of life or causes catastrophic damage and costs, the WMO Tropical Cyclone Committees will strike the name from the list and retire the name. Then another name is selected to replace the retired name.

Names have been officially retired since 1954, with 2005 having the most names retired-five total [Dennis, Katrina, Rita, Stan and Wilma].

1979 was when the first permanent six-year storm name list was established. Before 1979, some storm names were simply not used anymore.

What happens if a storm forms in the off-season?

If a storm does form during the off-season, the storm takes the next name in the list based on the current calendar date.

Example: If a storms forms on December 26th, it would take the name from the previous season’s list.

Example: If a storm forms on March 15th, it would receive a name from the subsequent season’s list of names.

Wait-there’s only twenty-one names on the list, what if we have more storms than that?

In the event that we go through all twenty-ones names, additional names are taken from the Greek alphabet. It doesn’t happen often, but it has occurred before. In 2005, twenty-eight storms were named. The last six storms took on names in the Greek alphabet; “Alpha,” “Beta,” “Gamma,” “Delta,” “Epsilon,” and “Zeta.”

What are the names for 2014?

Arthur

Bertha

Cristobal

Dolly

Edouard

Fay

Gonzalo

Hanna

Isaias

Josephine

Kyle

Laura

Marco

Nana

Omar

Paulette

Rene

Sally

Teddy

Vicky

Wilfred


National Hurricane Center Main Page

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